Fantasy Celebration: Guest Post with Nadia Lee

We want to give a big warm welcome to the most lovely Nadia Lee, author of Carnal Secrets, and her latest, The Last Slayer. Today, Nadia talks about her inspirations for The Last Slayer which is an Urban Fantasy novel about a heroine who is a demon hunter. Too learn more about Nadia and her books, click here.

Inspired
by Nadia Lee

I grew up in Asia, and now that I’m back here, I’ve started watching a lot of Korean dramas.  These are like soap operas or prime time shows without the season breaks that they have in America.  So if you follow me on Twitter, you might have seen me talk to Shawntelle Madison or Anne Soward about K-dramas.

Out of the numerous drama genres, I’m exceptionally partial to court intrigues.  In these dramas, if you don’t win, you die, and in order to win, many are willing to sacrifice anything and anyone, including their family, even unto the children.  And the characters often speak of the need to sacrifice the small to achieve the great.  (Unfortunately, so many characters deem family, love and other personal happinesses “the small.”)

Years ago I happened to see one in which the king had to eliminate his own son. Despite the prince’s supporters’ best efforts, the king got his way in the end.  It was heartbreaking (and horrifying), and I started thinking about what if’s.  What if the prince had been saved?  What if the king were deeply conflicted (he wasn’t THAT conflicted in the original)?  What if, what if, what if…

So that, along with two lines from an old Asian comic book (which you can read about here), got me writing The Last Slayer.  Of course The Last Slayer doesn’t have kings, queens and princes — well, not as the primary characters — but you can see a hint of what inspired me underneath the action, dragons, demigods and their cruel, centuries-long schemes.

The Last Slayer

Ashera del Cid is a talented demon hunter, but when she kills a demigod’s pet dragon, the hunter becomes the hunted. Her only potential ally is Ramiel, a sexy-as-hell demon. Now the two must work together to battle dragons and demigods…and the chemistry crackling between them.

Ramiel has his own reasons for offering Ashera his protection. He knows her true identity and the real reason the demigods want her dead. What he can’t predict is how she’ll react when she discovers he knew who she was all along…

Ashera is shocked to discover that she is the only daughter of the last slayer. To claim her destiny, she and Ramiel must join forces to face down danger and outwit their enemies. Only then will she be able to truly accept her legacy…

Where to buy The Last Slayer

Carina Press | All Romance eBooks | Kindle eBook | Nook | Book Depository | Books on Board | Kobo | Sony

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About Nadia Lee

Bilingual former management consultant Nadia Lee has lived in four different countries and enjoyed many adventures and excellent food around the globe. In the last eight years, she has kissed stingrays, been bitten by a shark, ridden an elephant and petted tigers.

She shares an apartment overlooking a river and palm trees in Japan with her husband, baby boy, winter white hamsters and an ever-widening pile of books. When she’s not writing, she can be found digging through old Asian historical texts or planning another trip.

Where to Find Nadia Lee

http://www.nadialee.net/
http://www.facebook.com/nadialeewrites/
http://www.twitter.com/nadialee/
http://nadialeewrites.tumblr.com/
http://www.goodreads.com/nadialee/

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Comments

  1. says

    Hi Nadia!

    It was interesting to read about your inspiration for The Last Slayer.

    And to Lou- an excellent job with the links & post!

    I look forward to reading The Last Slayer.

    All the best,
    RK Charron

    ReplyReply

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